Learning from a mistake

Monday, December 12, 2011 | En Español

I had a new experience in life yesterday, one which I never experienced before: the experience of being robbed. While the details are not important (I am perfectly fine), I am going to sound a little crazy but I am actually glad that it happened, in this way at least. I think and I usually affirm that I am a very paranoid person, but there are flaws, which became evident yesterday, concerning me paying attention to the surroundings some times.

I am glad because thanks to the experience I am much safer now when walking on the street than I ever was before. I had to go out the following morning, and without acting up all paranoid and stuff, I was noticing the behavior of people in a way that I just wouldn't do it before. In fact, I think my whole paranoia was just fear of being robbed, because it never occurred to me in the past. And of course, I am also glad that I wasn't physically injured in any way, plus I am nearly broke so I didn't really have much of value on me, maybe my running shoes but I did used them intensively for months.

Why am I writing all of this?, because just as I learned to be more careful and aware of my surroundings because of my failure to notice the incoming danger, our greatest failures in life also have the potential of teach us something, even if it is what not to do. I think I acquired invaluable life experience, and it only cost me that pair of somewhat wear-down running shoes.

People who already failed to create a successful company is more likely to open up a successful one, not because of chance, but because of the experience of failing before, and I think that this applies to pretty much every aspect in life. The fastest way to learn something, is by making a mistake.

I'm off now, but I'll leave with a pair of quotes that I know. I am still figuring out how to become sustainable get some stability and some extra free time.

"Failure is the opportunity to begin again more intelligently." Henry Ford

"I think everyone should experience defeat at least once during their career. You learn a lot from it." Lou Holtz

Categories: Thoughts